Origami Heart

Making a folded heart can be a nice small craft for Valentine’s Day.  These hearts aren’t hard to make compared to a lot of origami patterns.   There are lots of instructions on YouTube but it is a nice, easy to follow example.

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Stamped Shirts

My unit made these shirts as part of the Mighty Minds challenge but they would work for other topics too.

Materials:

  • 1 white shirt for each girl
  • 1 -6 bottles of fabric paint
  • wax paper
  • foam letters
  • tart tins to hold the paint
  • paint brushes
  • plastic table clothes to cover work area (optional)

I bought mine though tshirt.ca and they offer a good price but if you have a smaller unit you might want to check the price in local stores as shipping costs may make the shirts too expensive.  I choose to go with all XL youth which will be dress sized for some of my Guides but will fit everyone. The foam letters were in the toy section of Dollarama.  I suspect they were intended for teaching toddlers the alphabet but they were a good size and had a little texture to them so they held the paint well.

Method:

Slip a piece of wax paper inside each shirt.  This will prevent the paint from leaching though.  If a girl wants to paint a message on a sleeve you might need additional wax paper.  Give the girls a little time to think about what they want to write on their shirt and to gather their letters.  The girls can dip or paint the fabric paint on to the wrong side of their letter and then stamp it onto the shirt.  Some of the girls choose to add a little bit of splatter paint to the shirts once the message was in place.  Let dry for 12 plus hours.

Paint Night

Paint Nights in pubs have become a fun outing for many adults and I’ve seen many Guiders adapting the idea for their units with great success.  There are many painting instructional videos available on YouTube.  If you have the capacity to play the video at your meeting, you could do it directly.  Or you can have a couple of Guiders watch the video though a couple of times and provide the girls direction.  The YouTube videos range in length from 30 min to about 1:30.  This would likely take up a whole meeting or might be a great extended activity at an indoor camp or sleepover.

Typically you need a couple of different sizes of paint brushes per girl, a canvas (check dollar stores for inexpensive canvases), paint (feel free to use left over craft paint rather then acrylic) and some water.

If you want to complete the Paint Night experience, you might also want some light refreshments like popcorn and lemon aid.

Encourage the girls not to get too caught up in the exact instructions but instead to let their creativity shine.  No one expects their painting to look just like the one in the sample/video.

This is an example of the sort of videos you find on YouTube.

Dryer Lint Clay

I’ve found two different recipe for turning dryer lint into clay.  Once dry these sculptures have a felted look to them.

The first recipe doesn’t require cooking but may need to be placed in a mold rather then hand sculpted.

  • 2 cups firmly packed dryer lint
  • 1/3 cup warm water
  • 6 tablespoons white glue
  • 1 tablespoon clear dishwashing liquid
  • Food coloring
  1. Put all the ingredients in a bowl.
  2. Mix thoroughly with a spoon or hands until you get a uniform texture.

The second recipe requires more preparation but can be hand modeled like clay.

  • 3 cups (shredded) dryer lint.
  • 2 cups water.
  • cup flour.
  • ½ teaspoon vegetable oil.
  1. Place dryer lint in a pot
  2. One at a time add the other ingredients, stirring in as you go.
  3. Stir continuously over low heat until the mixture binds together and is of a smooth consistency.
  4. Pour onto a sheet of wax paper to cool.

Either way the finished art should be dried for 3 to 5 days.

What Happened Next?

Girls sit in a circle and each is given a picture on any subject.  The pictures need have no relationship to each other.  Starting at any in the circle, on girl begins to tell a story bringing in the subject of her picture.  Example: picture of an elephant – “There was once an elephant who was captured by a hunter when it was still very young.  It was  brought to Canada and presented as a pet to a five year old boy named Jeremy Jonquil”… etc.  When the players has exhausted her powers of imagination (or after agreed upon time limit.)  She breaks of saying, “What happened next?” she points to another player in the circle.  This girl must carry on with the story bringing in her picture.  Game ends when all girls have participated.