3D Animal Tracks

This website contains 3D models of many Canadian Animal tracks.  They create the models by taking many (20 plus) photos of a track found in the wild from different angles.  In addition to the digital 3D models they also have created 3D printer STL files so if you have access to a 3D printer you can print out the models to show kids in the field.  The site also has instructions for taking your own photos of tracks you may come across to add to their database.  That might be a fun project for Pathfinders or Rangers.


The 3d animal tracks project


Plaster Animal Tracks

You will need:

  • Plaster of Paris
  • Something to mix in suck as large plastic bags or old ice cream tubs
  • A stick or paint stir stick
  • tracks in mud or snow
  • Cardboard  strips (optional)
  • Vaseline (optional)


  1. Find or make tracks.  Ideally you locate tracks in nature that have been made by wild animals.  However, you can use an old cast to press new tracks.  This makes a handy backup plan if you aren’t sure you’ll be able to find good tracks or if you have a large unit.
  2. Clear away any brush or debris from around the track, so you have a clean work area.
  3. If you wish, create a cardboard collar around the track to limit the spread of the plaster.  Coat the inside of the collar in Vaseline so it can be removed later.
  4. Mix your Plaster of Paris.  Follow the instructions on the package but in general you are looking for two parts plaster to one part water.  You will need to work quickly to make you mold before the plaster starts to dry.
  5. Pour your plaster over the track.
  6. Allow at least 20 minutes to dry.  If it is cold or really wet this may take longer.
  7. Once the plaster is dry, pry it up off the ground and rinse off extra dirt in water.

Here is a video showing a similar technique:

Forest Bathing

This is an interesting article on the Japanese practice of Forest Bathing.

Forest bathing—basically just being in the presence of trees—became part of a national public health program in Japan in 1982 when the forestry ministry coined the phrase shinrin-yoku and promoted topiary as therapy. … Just be with trees. No hiking, no counting steps on a Fitbit. You can sit or meander, but the point is to relax rather than accomplish anything.

I don’t think it will be a surprise to anyone in Guiding that being outdoors in nature is good for Mental Health.  But this piece can serve as a good reminder that we don’t always need to be so goal driven when we are in nature.  I’ve given my Guides time to just be with trees while we were on hikes.  Just wonder among the trees.  Smell the forest.  Feel the bark.  Some of the girls really enjoyed it, some didn’t really know what to do.

Fire Camp

A Camp for Girl Guides

Theme:  This camp is based on the element Fire.  It was largely based on the BC Camps to Go: Guiding Elements Fire and their .  For this camp cooking is a core part of the program and it is a great choice if your girls don’t have a lot of experience doing outdoor cooking because you can make room in the program to take your time with the food.

Guide Program Work:  This camp was designed to allow girls to work on their Outdoor Cooking badge and Basic Camper emblem.

Patrols: Patrols could be named after different types of wood or types of fires.


  1. Make a fire starter
  2. waterproof matches (from the Fire instant meeting)
  3. buddy burners and Tin Can Stoves
  4. Practice Lighting matches/jar over candle what do fires need (from BC Girl Guides Fire Camp)
  5. Light a camp stove/ camp stove safety
  6. Woodpiles
  7. fire safety
  8. fire drama activity (also from the Fire instant meeting)





Campfire Openings


Survivor Camp

A Camp for Girl Guides

Theme:  This camp is themed around the reality tv show Survivor.

Guide Program Work:  This camp was designed for the Outdoor Adventure badge but there are others you could do just as easily.

Patrols: Call the patrols tribes.  Each tribe should have a colour and each girl given an inexpensive buff or bandanna to show their tribe.  We named our tribes off of tropical islands such as Bali, Bora Bora or Tahiti.

Opening: We used tiki torches for our campfire the first night.  They set the mood for the weekend.


  • trail signs
  • Shelter building
  • Gadgets, Catapults  or a Merry-go-round
  • Lost at Sea Scenario
  • Tribal council: We had the girls vote on 5 or 6 camp awards such as funniest, quietest, most helpful etc.
  • Idols: We made a idol out of a jar decorated with Popsicle sticks and feather.  Inside the jar we’d hide a coupon for something (like first served a dessert or help from a Guider at an activity). Our Pathfinder helpers took great delight in finding new places to hide the jar throughout the weekend and the girls enjoyed searching for it in their free moments.
  • Build a raft to see if you can keep a potato (or Barbie doll) afloat.  You can do this as a gadget out of sticks or Popsicle sticks.  Or out of recycled material
  • Finding North without a compass



  • relay races
  • Wide Game: survival luxuries.  Played like Smugglers and Spies but with luxury items from Survivor such as Rice and Beans, Chickens, Fishing Gear, Hammock, Fire making supplies, Tarps, Spices, Fruit
  • Night Game – Post Office but call it tree mail.


  • bugs on a log (celery with peanut butter and raisins)
  • tropical fruit


We had each patrol create a short skit about something funny that happened at camp for the final campfire.  They were fantastic.

Ecology Frame

This craft creates a popsicle stick shadow box for your camp memories.


  • popsicle sticks
  • cardboard (or foam core) backing
  • various types of seeds or small rocks, seed pods etc.
  • white glue


  1. Glue popsicle sticks together as sown in diagram.  Having 4 on top of each other as show in diagram, having 3 on top of each other as shown, overlapping the ends.
  2. Glue a piece of cardboard onto the sticks to form a back
  3. Dividers are now made by cutting the sticks to desired length and glueing into the frame on their edges.
  4. Glue seeds of various types into the sections, with one section.

Alternative layouts for the shadow box.