Real Superhero

That person who helps others simply because it should or must be done, and because it is the right thing to do, is indeed without a doubt, a real superhero.

– Stan Lee

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Pringles Ring

This looks fun and challenging

Time: 20-30 min

Materials (per patrol):

  • 1 can of Pringles chips (flavoured may work better)
  • 1 photo of the ring
  • Paper to cover surfaces

Instructions:

  1. Have all the girls wash their hands so they can eat the chips after the challenge
  2. By placing the chips carefully (you don’t want to break them) you can build this ring without using any other materials.
  3. Once you have built the ring, enjoy your snack.

Talk for One Minute On…

This is a quick activity that can help girls warm up to public speaking.  If you have a small unit (10 or less) you can play as one group otherwise you might want to break girls into patrols.

In an envelope or cup place slips of paper that all have a topic around a central theme.  Ideally the theme should be picked so that it is something all the girls are familiar with.  Some examples might be colours, ice cream flavours, popular book or movie characters etc.  Use a timer or a phone to keep track of each girls turn.  On her turn she should pull a slip of paper and the aim is for her to talk about the subject in a authoritative way for the full minute.

Extension:  I visited a Pathfinder unit last year who used a variant on this idea to open their meeting each week.  Each girl had 2 minutes to talk about how her week had gone so far.  The girls really seemed to like it but some of them were clearly challenged to talk about themselves for two full minutes.

Deliver Your Dreams

This week my Guides worked on the new Deliver Your Dream activity on the Girls First platform. This is Girl Guides of Canada’s contribution to Women Deliver 2019 Mobilization Canada

Since we’ve had a couple of meetings in a row that involved giving them girls a blank piece of white paper and telling them to fill it with something, we opted instead to go more colourful and got out some scrapbooking supplies.  It was great fun to see what the girls came up with and the girls in our unit are certainly interested in pursuing a wide variety of careers.  I opted to photograph each of the girls work so they could take them home and then I submitted them to the Add Your Voice page.  But mailing the originals is also an option for those in parts of the country where data is more dear.

We finished the meeting with a couple of rounds of Stand With Me.  It took a few turns to get the girls on track with this activity (not to be silly) but once they got going they voiced a lot of their opinions.

What’s Your problem?

Feminism has fought no wars. It has killed no opponents. It has set up no concentration camps, starved no enemies, practiced no cruelties. Its battles have been for education, for the vote, for better working conditions, for safety in the streets, for child care, for social welfare, for rape crisis centres, women’s refuges, reforms in the law. If someone says, ‘Oh, I’m not a feminist’, I ask, ‘Why? What’s your problem?
― Dale Spender

More they Stay the Same

I wanted to create and activity for my Guides to give them a sense of how the Guide program has changed over the last 110 years.  When asking my Guides how they felt about the new Girls First program, I wanted to take the focus off a fear of change and concentrate on how they felt about the actual changes.

So I created a flip up question quiz.  These question on intended to be attached to a folded piece of paper with the question on the outside and the answer on the inside.  Similar to the format you often see an interpretive centers.  It worked really well.  I stuck the quiz up around the room and told the unit to check them out in small groups (2 or 3).  I’ve also created a version for Pathfinders/Rangers and one for Brownies.

You could also use a selection of these questions as a gathering activity for a multi-branch event (but there is some overlap so you’d want to just us a selection of them)

Flip Quiz

A flip quiz is a technique you often see used in interpretive centers or other self education displays.  I recently used one to great success with my Guides to learn a little about the history of Guide Badges in Canada (more on that tomorrow).

How to make a flip quiz.

  1. Gather a set of questions.  It is best if they are multiple choice or single word questions.
  2. (Optional) gather some fun facts or additional information to match each question
  3. Fold paper (I used construction paper) in half to create a flap.  Attach the questions to the front of the flap and the answers/fun facts to the inside of the flap.
  4. Tape the flaps around the play space and give the Guides time to explore them on their own.
  5. You may want to get together as a group afterwards to find out what the girls thought was the most interesting or surprising information.

This idea can be adapted to all sorts of ideas where there are facts to be conveyed but you don’t want to make it like school.   You could even have the girls create a question each (or work on several as a patrol).