Moon Viewer

I didn’t find this activity in time for my moon meeting but this is a really neat project to do along with or instead of Oreo Moons.  This idea comes from the Science Notebooking blog. To make it you need a black paper plate and a Popsicle or tongue depressor stick, some white paper, tape and glue.  Cut out the middle of the plate.  Tape the stick to the back of the plate.  Then cut out the different phase of the moon and glue them to the plate.

Alternatively, you can print out a more refined version of this project from E is for Explore!.

Once completed, girls can hold the plate up to the moon and figure out what phase it is in or between.

Grass Heads

This is a nice project for Understand How to be Responsible #5.
20170222_081635Materials:

  • length of nylon stockings
  • grass seeds
  • top soil
  • eyes
  • floss or thread
  • glue
  • misc craft supplies (optional)

Instructions:

  1. Cut your nylon stocking into pieces.  We found we  could get six piece from each pair of stockings, three from each leg.
  2. If you don’t have the toe,  tie one end with floss or thread and turn the stocking inside out.  If you have a toe you can skip this step.
  3. Place one tablespoon of grass seed in the stocking.
  4. Fill the stocking with a cup or so of soil.
  5. Tie the bottom of the stocking with more floss or thread.
  6. Pull out one clump of dirt and wrap floss around it to form a nose.
  7. Use white or hot glue to attach the eyes.
  8. You can add felt, pipe cleaners etc to create eye brows, bow ties, etc but don’t cover the top of the head.
  9. Place in a cup and keep damp.  The grass hair will grow in about a week.

You might want to warn the girls to keep their grass heads away from pets as in our unit we had at least one grass head given a hair cut by the family cat.

Ocean Aware

The  Ocean Aware Challenge was developed by the BC Program committee and  Ocean Networks Canada.  It is designed to get you to think differently about oceans whether you live near one or not. The challenge is centered around 7 principles of ocean literacy.  There are suggested activities for each principle with detailed instructions for each one.   A lot of the activities are suitable for a wide range of ages making this a great challenge for multi-branch units.  This challenge would also be a great starting place for planning an underwater themed camp.

Thinking Day Meeting

For Thinking Day this year we held a bring a parent night.  We made all the parents honourary Guides for the night.  They even marched into horseshoe with their girls.

We based the meeting around this years WAGGGS Thinking Day Challenge Grow.

After horseshoe we all played CABAÑA, GUEST, or VOLCANO to complete the roots section.  Then we split into three groups for a round robin. 

The first station was run by a Guider originally from Holland who taught them a party game where you eat snack bread off a string while blindfolded.  Everyone also got to try the snack bread she’d made.

The second station was the Grow your collaboration game from the challenge pack.  We ran that out in the hallway where we could set up a good maze of wool.  The girls and parents went though the maze three times, once on their own.  Once holding hands with a partner.  And once holding hands with one partner blindfolded.

The final station was our seeds stop, were the girls made seed heads (instructions soon) with the help of their parents.

After the round robin we had a badge presentation for all the badges the girls have earned since enrollment.  It was nice to have the parents there for that.

Why Thinking Day

In 1926, Girl Guide and Girl Scout delegates from around the globe met in the USA for the 4th World Conference. Among other decisions, they agreed that there should be a special annual day when Girl Guides and Girl Scouts around the world think of each other and express their thanks and appreciation for our international Movement. This was called Thinking Day. The delegates chose 22 February as the date for Thinking Day because it was the birthday of both Lord Baden-Powell, founder of the Boy Scout Movement, and Olave Baden-Powell, who was World Chief Guide.

WAGGGS.org

Paint Night

Paint Nights in pubs have become a fun outing for many adults and I’ve seen many Guiders adapting the idea for their units with great success.  There are many painting instructional videos available on YouTube.  If you have the capacity to play the video at your meeting, you could do it directly.  Or you can have a couple of Guiders watch the video though a couple of times and provide the girls direction.  The YouTube videos range in length from 30 min to about 1:30.  This would likely take up a whole meeting or might be a great extended activity at an indoor camp or sleepover.

Typically you need a couple of different sizes of paint brushes per girl, a canvas (check dollar stores for inexpensive canvases), paint (feel free to use left over craft paint rather then acrylic) and some water.

If you want to complete the Paint Night experience, you might also want some light refreshments like popcorn and lemon aid.

Encourage the girls not to get too caught up in the exact instructions but instead to let their creativity shine.  No one expects their painting to look just like the one in the sample/video.

This is an example of the sort of videos you find on YouTube.

Oreo Cookie Moons

I was looking for an interesting way to teach our girls about the phases of the moon when I came across this activity that uses Oreo cookies. Like the write on Sciencebob.com, “I’ve always been a fan of science activities that you can eat.” Sadly you can’t use Girl Guide sandwich cookies as you really need the contrast between the white icing and the dark cookie.  We split the girls up into groups of 4.  Each girl got two cookies (a reasonable serving size).  We also gave them napkins to work on, sticks to scrap icing off with and a copy of the PDF activity sheet from Sciencebob.